The Journal of Healthcare Ethics & Administration (JHEA) is an international open-access online journal that reflects the issues on medicine and healthcare administration. The JHEA welcomes original researches, review articles, and case studies, etc. by scholars, medical and law professionals, and healthcare administrators who desire to share knowledge through the dissemination of published works. Each published article in the journal is approved by an international editorial board before publication using a double-blind, peer-review process.
The Journal of Healthcare Ethics & Administration (JHEA) is an international open-access online journal that reflects the issues on medicine and healthcare administration.
The JHEA welcomes original researches, review articles, and case studies, etc. by scholars, medical and law professionals, and healthcare administrators who desire to share knowledge through the dissemination of published works online. Each published article in the journal is approved by an international editorial board before publication using a double-blind, peer-review process.

Current Issue: Vol.3 No.2 (Fall/Winter 2017)
ISSN 2474-2309

CONCISE ARGUMENT

Proposing an Ethical Foundation for Access to Patient Data through “Care Everywhere” and “Happy Together”: A Case of Novant Health

Vol. 3 No. 2 (Fall/Winter 2017): 1-3. https://doi.org/10.22461/jhea.8.7162.

David Kame, MBA

Despite the scientific and political advances made in the areas of prevention and treatment to curb the devastation caused by HIV/AIDS, the pandemic continues to exert an enormous toll especially in sub-Saharan Africa. Sub-Saharan Africa carries about 70 percent of the world’s HIV/AIDS burden. Interestingly, an effective preventive measure against HIV/AIDS seems to have been found in one of mankind’s most common and oldest cultural and religious rituals, that is male circumcision. The conclusive evidence from three randomized control trials in Africa indicates that circumcised males have a lower risk of HIV infection. Medical experts and researchers advocate that male circumcision is best done at infancy for optimum health benefits. This paper explores the ethical justification for mandating neonatal male circumcision in sub-Saharan Africa, perhaps with an opt-out clause, as one of the bold measures government could take to prevent the spread of HIV. The notion of the common good consistent with Thomistic theological anthropology, which David Hollenbach examined in his thesis of the common good, is proposed as the justifying ethical measure. However, the proposal in this essay shall be exploratory rather than prescriptive.

What Happened to the 2017 Measles Outbreak in Minnesota?: An Argument against “Anti-Vaxxers”

Vol. 3 No. 2 (Fall/Winter 2017): 4-7. https://doi.org/10.22461/jhea.8.7163.

Lacie Thompson, BS, MT(ACSP)CM

Abstract
Despite the scientific and political advances made in the areas of prevention and treatment to curb the devastation caused by HIV/AIDS, the pandemic continues to exert an enormous toll especially in sub-Saharan Africa. Sub-Saharan Africa carries about 70 percent of the world’s HIV/AIDS burden. Interestingly, an effective preventive measure against HIV/AIDS seems to have been found in one of mankind’s most common and oldest cultural and religious rituals, that is male circumcision. The conclusive evidence from three randomized control trials in Africa indicates that circumcised males have a lower risk of HIV infection. Medical experts and researchers advocate that male circumcision is best done at infancy for optimum health benefits. This paper explores the ethical justification for mandating neonatal male circumcision in sub-Saharan Africa, perhaps with an opt-out clause, as one of the bold measures government could take to prevent the spread of HIV. The notion of the common good consistent with Thomistic theological anthropology, which David Hollenbach examined in his thesis of the common good, is proposed as the justifying ethical measure. However, the proposal in this essay shall be exploratory rather than prescriptive.

REVIEW ARTICLE/LAW AND ETHICS

In the Wake of Henrietta Lacks: Current U.S. Law and Policy on Control and Ownership of One’s Body Tissues Used in Medical Research

Vol. 3 No. 2 (Fall/Winter 2017): 8-18. https://doi.org/10.22461/jhea.1.71614.

Barry K. Shuster, JD, MBA, MSBioethics

Abstract
Oprah Winfrey’s recent adaptation of Rebecca Skloot’s book “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, has reinvigorated interest in the story of an African-American tobacco farmer from Southern Virginia who was diagnosed with cervical cancer when she was 30, and who died in 1951. Lacks would have lived and died in relative anonymity, but for a scientist at John Hopkins University Hospital, who removed a tissue sample from Lacks and created what has been deemed the first “immortal human cell line”. Lacks’ story is not only compelling in terms of human drama, but continues to raise questions regarding the societal and economic value of human tissue. The law has attempted to address the attendant legal and moral questions; for example, through the informed consent requirements of the Common Rule and jurisprudence and legislation that avoids designating human tissue and its byproducts as “property”. Nevertheless, as this review of the law proposes, there is potential for unsettled legal issues involving ownership of one’s body tissues used in medical research to be raised.

HEALTH ORGANIZATION AND ETHICS

Pharma’s Marketing Influence on Medical Students and the Need for Culturally Competent and Stricter Policy and Educational Curriculum in Medical Schools: A Comparative Analysis of Social Scientific Research between Poland and the U.S.

Vol. 3 No. 2 (Fall/Winter 2017): 19-33. https://doi.org/10.22461/ jhea.6.7161.

Marta Makowska, Ph.D. , George P. Sillup, Ph.D., and Marvin J. H. Lee, Ph.D.

Abstract
It is reported that medical students both in the U.S. and Poland have experience of interacting with pharmaceutical company representatives (pharma reps) during their school years. Studies have warned that the interaction typically initiated by the pharma reps’ general gift-giving eventually leads to the quid pro quo relationship between the pharma company and the future doctors, the result of which is that the doctors will prescribe their patients drugs in favor of the pharma company. Built upon the existing finding, this research engages in analysis with three foci. The first is to compare attitudinal differences of the American and Polish medical students as they interact with pharma reps. Second, it investigates the role of the different economic and cultural elements (respectively in the U.S. and Poland) in the students’ attitudinal differences. Last, it suggests that the medical schools in both countries should have strict policies and effective education curriculum to help their students better prepare to interact ethically with pharma reps. Since there has been no direct comparative cultural analysis of this kind which is known in a published literature or report, the authors believe that the paper will serve as a catalyst for further research in the area.

COMPARATIVE CULTURE AND RELIGION

Cultural Immersion and Global Health: An Experience Among the Guaranis

Vol. 3 No. 2 (Fall/Winter 2017): 34.-39 https://doi.org/10.22461/jhea.5.7161.

Alexandre A. Martins, Ph.D.

Despite the scientific and political advances made in the areas of prevention and treatment to curb the devastation caused by HIV/AIDS, the pandemic continues to exert an enormous toll especially in sub-Saharan Africa. Sub-Saharan Africa carries about 70 percent of the world’s HIV/AIDS burden. Interestingly, an effective preventive measure against HIV/AIDS seems to have been found in one of mankind’s most common and oldest cultural and religious rituals, that is male circumcision. The conclusive evidence from three randomized control trials in Africa indicates that circumcised males have a lower risk of HIV infection. Medical experts and researchers advocate that male circumcision is best done at infancy for optimum health benefits. This paper explores the ethical justification for mandating neonatal male circumcision in sub-Saharan Africa, perhaps with an opt-out clause, as one of the bold measures government could take to prevent the spread of HIV. The notion of the common good consistent with Thomistic theological anthropology, which David Hollenbach examined in his thesis of the common good, is proposed as the justifying ethical measure. However, the proposal in this essay shall be exploratory rather than prescriptive.

CASE STUDY/THEORETICAL ETHICS

On the Oregon Health Authority’s Recent Ban on Elective Surgery for Smokers with Medicaid: An Ethical Analysis

Vol. 3 No. 2 (Fall/Winter 2017): 40-50. https://doi.org/10.22461/jhea.2.7165.

Marvin J. H. Lee, Ph.D. and Peter Grossnickle

Abstract
Starting January 1, 2017, the Oregon Health Authority (OHA, henceforth) made a sweeping decision that no elective surgery is to be performed for Medicaid recipients who smoke tobacco. The authors of this paper investigate the administrative procedures behind the OHA’s decision, explore some possible ethical arguments for and against the decision, and render our ethical verdict about the ban and our suggestion for the OHA. Meanwhile, since this issue involves the problems of smoking-related addiction, the agent’s autonomy which may be understood in the light of moral freedom and rationality/irrationality, and our society’s perception about obesity and cigarette smoking; the paper engages in a deeper philosophical debate about the problems beyond the legal purview of the ban.

SPIRITUALITY AND ETHICS

The Words Left Unspoken: Stories Surrounding the Hospital Medical Futility Policy

Vol. 3 No. 2 (Fall/Winter 2017): 51-54. https://doi.org/10.22461/jhea.9.7163.

Olivia Nguyen

Despite the scientific and political advances made in the areas of prevention and treatment to curb the devastation caused by HIV/AIDS, the pandemic continues to exert an enormous toll especially in sub-Saharan Africa. Sub-Saharan Africa carries about 70 percent of the world’s HIV/AIDS burden. Interestingly, an effective preventive measure against HIV/AIDS seems to have been found in one of mankind’s most common and oldest cultural and religious rituals, that is male circumcision. The conclusive evidence from three randomized control trials in Africa indicates that circumcised males have a lower risk of HIV infection. Medical experts and researchers advocate that male circumcision is best done at infancy for optimum health benefits. This paper explores the ethical justification for mandating neonatal male circumcision in sub-Saharan Africa, perhaps with an opt-out clause, as one of the bold measures government could take to prevent the spread of HIV. The notion of the common good consistent with Thomistic theological anthropology, which David Hollenbach examined in his thesis of the common good, is proposed as the justifying ethical measure. However, the proposal in this essay shall be exploratory rather than prescriptive.

INVITED COMMENTARY

Not Justice but a Gift: Advocacy for Hospice Care

Vol. 3 No. 2 (Fall/Winter 2017): 55-56. https://doi.org/10.22461/jhea.4.71612.

Nicholas Probol

Despite the scientific and political advances made in the areas of prevention and treatment to curb the devastation caused by HIV/AIDS, the pandemic continues to exert an enormous toll especially in sub-Saharan Africa. Sub-Saharan Africa carries about 70 percent of the world’s HIV/AIDS burden. Interestingly, an effective preventive measure against HIV/AIDS seems to have been found in one of mankind’s most common and oldest cultural and religious rituals, that is male circumcision. The conclusive evidence from three randomized control trials in Africa indicates that circumcised males have a lower risk of HIV infection. Medical experts and researchers advocate that male circumcision is best done at infancy for optimum health benefits. This paper explores the ethical justification for mandating neonatal male circumcision in sub-Saharan Africa, perhaps with an opt-out clause, as one of the bold measures government could take to prevent the spread of HIV. The notion of the common good consistent with Thomistic theological anthropology, which David Hollenbach examined in his thesis of the common good, is proposed as the justifying ethical measure. However, the proposal in this essay shall be exploratory rather than prescriptive.